Best approach to track this shot? Part Duex

I am doing a screen replacement for 2 tv monitors in this shot:
I can track the far right LCD monitor no problem using the red matte.

I can’t get a good track on the monitor on the left. I attempted to track it with a shape simiar to the right monitor but it drifted quite a bit. The best solution I came up with is breaking the track into two layers, with a third layer to block the foreground head. (see pic with green mattes). It’s kludgey, the corner pin data is pretty wonky for the first 1/3 of the shot. I’ve tried to adjust the track but there isn’t anywhere to attach the corner adjustments in an obvious way.
Does anyone have an idea on a better approach to solving this track on the left?
Much appreciated!

So on a scale of 1 - 10. 1 being anyone can do it, 10 being track by hand. Where does this shot lay?
I perceive it as a 6-7. Being new to this and trying to grasp the Mocha workflow, I find this hard in that there isn’t a lot of trackable data on the monitor and the beginning of the shot moves by very fast. Also there aren’t any tracking points to use for the adjust track function that correspond to the monitor.
What is your assessment?

I am doing a screen replacement for 2 tv monitors in this shot:

I can track the far right LCD monitor no problem using the red matte.

I can’t get a good track on the monitor on the left. I attempted to track it with a shape simiar to the right monitor but it drifted quite a bit. The best solution I came up with is breaking the track into two layers, with a third layer to block the foreground head. (see pic with green mattes). It’s kludgey, the corner pin data is pretty wonky for the first 1/3 of the shot. I’ve tried to adjust the track but there isn’t anywhere to attach the corner adjustments in an obvious way.

Does anyone have an idea on a better approach to solving this track on the left?

Much appreciated!

If I understand all the Mocha tutorials correctly the shapes I make to track the monitor all need to be on the same plane, right?

If I understand all the Mocha tutorials correctly the shapes I make to track the monitor all need to be on the same plane, right?

So on a scale of 1 - 10. 1 being anyone can do it, 10 being track by hand. Where does this shot lay?

I perceive it as a 6-7. Being new to this and trying to grasp the Mocha workflow, I find this hard in that there isn’t a lot of trackable data on the monitor and the beginning of the shot moves by very fast. Also there aren’t any tracking points to use for the adjust track function that correspond to the monitor.

What is your assessment?

That is the best list I have ever seen! I am printing that out.
I found the shot to be a five, and I finally got it to work. Thank you for your quick responses.

That is the best list I have ever seen! I am printing that out.

I found the shot to be a five, and I finally got it to work. Thank you for your quick responses.

That’s right, but you can also sometimes be a little loose with that. The mocha tracker only needs to think it’s planar.
For example trees are generally not planar, but from a distance they look planar. This is normally the best approach to take. If your eyes say planar, it’s usually planar.
In the case of the monitor, on the front of it is definitely planar. You wouldn’t be able to use the sides or base. You can bleed the edge of the shape into the side though, as this can help the tracker define the plane.

You can add more than one shape to the same layer as you track and move those shapes around as more information presents itself. That way you don’t have to use two separate layers to do one track. I’d keep the mask on the man’s head though.
For those monitors however I would recommend turning on perspective and ramping up the min %of pixels used to about 90%. This will give you a much more solid track.

You can add more than one shape to the same layer as you track and move those shapes around as more information presents itself. That way you don’t have to use two separate layers to do one track. I’d keep the mask on the man’s head though.

For those monitors however I would recommend turning on perspective and ramping up the min %of pixels used to about 90%. This will give you a much more solid track.

That’s right, but you can also sometimes be a little loose with that. The mocha tracker only needs to think it’s planar.

For example trees are generally not planar, but from a distance they look planar. This is normally the best approach to take. If your eyes say planar, it’s usually planar.

In the case of the monitor, on the front of it is definitely planar. You wouldn’t be able to use the sides or base. You can bleed the edge of the shape into the side though, as this can help the tracker define the plane.

It’s a reasonably tough shot. In general, my 1-10 would be:

  1. Simple shot: Draw a shape and go. No effort required to get the track done.
  2. Reasonable shot: A few settings tweaks needed to make sure there is no drift, but no other shapes or adjustment required.
  3. Obscure shot: Takes a little while to find a good trackable area, but still tracks correctly without additional masks.
  4. Standard shot: Some shape adjustment or masks required to fix obstructions.
  5. Tough shot: Additional shapes and watching the track required.
  6. Workhorse shot: Mostly trackable, but adjust track or manual track needed to fix drift
  7. Frustrating shot: Trackable area moves in and out of shot with no other planar regions to track. Some manual work required.
  8. Nightmare shot: Multiple obstructions with completely covered sections, severe blur that destroys all detail, many adjustments needed, some manual tracking required.
  9. Impossible shot. No visible area to track.
  10. Polar bear behind highly reflective glass in a dense blizzard being shot with an out of focus PAL 25i SD camera mounted on an operating jackhammer. With the lens cap still on.

It’s a reasonably tough shot. In general, my 1-10 would be:

  1. Simple shot: Draw a shape and go. No effort required to get the track done.
  2. Reasonable shot: A few settings tweaks needed to make sure there is no drift, but no other shapes or adjustment required.
  3. Obscure shot: Takes a little while to find a good trackable area, but still tracks correctly without additional masks.
  4. Standard shot: Some shape adjustment or masks required to fix obstructions.
  5. Tough shot: Additional shapes and watching the track required.
  6. Workhorse shot: Mostly trackable, but adjust track or manual track needed to fix drift
  7. Frustrating shot: Trackable area moves in and out of shot with no other planar regions to track. Some manual work required.
  8. Nightmare shot: Multiple obstructions with completely covered sections, severe blur that destroys all detail, many adjustments needed, some manual tracking required.
  9. Impossible shot. No visible area to track.
  10. Polar bear behind highly reflective glass in a dense blizzard being shot with an out of focus PAL 25i SD camera mounted on an operating jackhammer. With the lens cap still on.