How to cut out a static background

Hi, I’m totally noobie here so please bear with me.
I have some footage with a static background and a person walking in.
I would like to remove/keyout the background so I can use the footage of the person (with transparent background) on other footage.

I started the usual way rotoscoping the actor but I always ended up with a sort of rough cutout with unpleasant edges around the person.

So I thought: would it be possible to go the other way round?
The noobie question is: would it be possible to keyout/whatever the entire background BEFORE the actor walks in? Since the background is static and the camera is on a tripod I thought chances are it is possible. And if so how do I go about it?

Thanks everybody
Mike

Hi, I’m totally noobie here so please bear with me.
I have some footage with a static background and a person walking in.
I would like to remove/keyout the background so I can use the footage of the person (with transparent background) on other footage.

I started the usual way rotoscoping the actor but I always ended up with a sort of rough cutout with unpleasant edges around the person.

So I thought: would it be possible to go the other way round?
The noobie question is: would it be possible to keyout/whatever the entire background BEFORE the actor walks in? Since the background is static and the camera is on a tripod I thought chances are it is possible. And if so how do I go about it?

Thanks everybody
Mike

Thanks for your reply Martin. I’ll look into it and give it a try. Steep learning curve ahead of me. Oh well … :slight_smile:

Thanks for your reply Martin. I’ll look into it and give it a try. Steep learning curve ahead of me. Oh well … :slight_smile:

Hi Mike,
You could try a combination of difference mattes and luma mattes in After Effects, but it depends entirely on how much noise/grain is in the shot. This may give you at the very least a core matte of which you can build up layers for the rest of the roto.
To help with the rotoscoping, you may want to have one layer to track the main motion of the actor, then break down your other roto layers into parts (ie. head, arms etc). If you link your roto shapes to the tracking layer it will help cut down some manual work.

Hi Mike,

You could try a combination of difference mattes and luma mattes in After Effects, but it depends entirely on how much noise/grain is in the shot. This may give you at the very least a core matte of which you can build up layers for the rest of the roto.

To help with the rotoscoping, you may want to have one layer to track the main motion of the actor, then break down your other roto layers into parts (ie. head, arms etc). If you link your roto shapes to the tracking layer it will help cut down some manual work.